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Author Topic: CP soap in the mold problems (soft soap)  (Read 2914 times)
soapfaerie
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« on: June 27, 2011, 02:58:36 AM »

 Undecided
 
i have a soap loaf mold.
Most times Im finding that after 24 hours when im ready to pull my soap out of my silicone mold, it is very very soft and does not want to come out.
ive tried putting it in the freezer even.
Once I get the soap out of the mold and 3 wks curing time, it's perfectly normal.
So, i'm not sure what the problem is.
i bought olive oil spray. I havn't tried that yet, is it ok to spray the sides? ive heard of using wax paper, but my loaf mold is only 40 oz. or so... not very large.
any ideas of suggestions, and if this has happened to you, what did you do?
any signification that I'm doing something wrong?

thank you all so much for any feedback
signed,
learning amateur.

angela
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Steve
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« Reply #1 on: June 27, 2011, 03:57:41 AM »

Hi Soap Faerie  Welcome to the forums!

Unfortunately, an olive oil spray will not help.  You see... if you spray your mold with olive oil, the olive oil will simply turn into soap when you make your batch.  Oil sprays like this work for baking, but not for soap making. 

Freezing or adding a small amount of heat usually works best for releasing your soap.  Another option is to line your mold with a substance that won't saponify, like petroleum Jelly. 

Silicone molds usually don't have sticking issues, so your recipe may produce a soap that is more sticky than normal.  Not necessarily a bad thing! 

Are you using a lot of castor oil?  Castor produces a pretty sticky soap. 

Finally, you may want to consider adding sodium lactate your your recipe as this will give you a harder bar of soap and it usually makes unmolding a lot easier.

I hope this helps and hopefully others will chime in with some other ideas Smiley
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taniaworth
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« Reply #2 on: June 27, 2011, 07:07:32 AM »

I have made soap in pvc pipe twice. first time it was extremely hard to get out so the next time I used Pam and I was able to get it out quite easily. My soap is hard and I use  use very little castor oil.
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panzerakc
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« Reply #3 on: June 27, 2011, 07:46:44 AM »

A couple of things:

Could you post the recipe you used?

Also, wax paper isn't sturdy enough to survive soapmaking.  You'd probably want to look at freezer paper, which has a slick side.  That's the side you'd put your soap against.

And it may just be that your soap needs more than 24 hours in the mold prior to taking it out.

Anita
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Monvi33
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« Reply #4 on: June 27, 2011, 10:09:43 AM »

Some soap just requires more time.  Especially with certain oils.  I use wood molds and line with freezer paper, then I can just un tape and pull it on out even if it is too soft to cut.  If I find it's still way to soft I just let it sit another day or so before I cut it. 

Or try increasing your hard oils.  I have never used silicone molds so I have no experience with that, but if you know someone handy with wood/tools a simple log mold is fairly easy to make.  You could also try mineral oil to line your silicone...that may help.
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goatsoap
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« Reply #5 on: June 27, 2011, 01:03:37 PM »

Monvi33 is right - some soaps just take more time.  I use a silicone loaf mold and occasionally I have to put it in the freezer to get it to release the soap.  Be sure it's frozen before you try to get it to release.  I have tried sprays and oils and nothing seems to work on some recipes except the freezer.  I have also noticed that after several uses, the silicone mold becomes "seasoned" and will release almost everytime with no problem. 
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soapfaerie
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« Reply #6 on: July 02, 2011, 03:16:38 AM »

everyone, this was pretty helpful;!
when i get home, I will post my recipe. the soap does turn out pretty l.uxorious. I do use fairly alot of Castor oil. i definitly will cut down on that.  I used fairly alot due to what the SOAPCALC
what are the oils you guys like to use larger qty's of in your recipes?
and I am going ot google the sodium lactate... what is that?

thank you,this gives me something to
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Monvi33
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« Reply #7 on: July 02, 2011, 01:34:57 PM »

Castor I usually only use up to 5-10% Usually 5%  I prefer olive oil soap so my largest ammount of oil is Always Olive. 
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soapbuddy
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« Reply #8 on: July 05, 2011, 01:56:10 PM »

Castor is considered a soft oil. In larger amount it will make your soap soft and hard to get out of your mold. I don't go above 5% of castor for mine. I also use sodium lactate in evert batch.
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soap1967
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« Reply #9 on: July 13, 2011, 04:27:02 AM »

Sodium lactate is a natural product that is derived from milk.  it is a very inexpensive product and is a blessing (in my opinion) to CP soap.  It will add hardness to your bars, make them more creamy, thicker lather, and will make the removal from your mold easier.  Sodium lactate is a clear, thickish liquid which is added into to lye solution.  If you go to MMS calculator you can check mark to add in sodium lactate and it will calculate the percentage for you based on the hardness you want to achieve.  I prefer soapcalc's lye calculator because it is easier to read, but I use MMS also just to calculate the sodium lactate percentage.  I love castor oil in my soap and generally use more than 5%.  The benefits are amazing to the skin and hair and the lather is extraordinary.  Higher useage of castor oil will make the bar go faster, I do think the sodium lactate helps slow that down a bit because of the hardness it adds in.  My customers love the lather from my bars and I have gotten no complaints about the length of time the bar lasts.  Fully cured the soap is not sticky at all. 
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