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Author Topic: OVEN CURE?  (Read 5624 times)
riverhouserustics
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« on: January 21, 2012, 08:38:16 AM »

I have a high end oven that has a button for "proofing" - like to get bread to rise.  The proof temp is quite low- below 170 though I would have to check the actual temp- and the convection fan runs during this cycle.  I just put some soap that was about 1 day old into the oven on metal drying racks to see if it would speed drying/cure time for cold processed soap.  This is my first attempt at this and the soap has only been in there a couple of hours.  Does anyone have any experience doing something like this?  I am wondering if it might ruin my soap- or if it may actually work?  Thanks.
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soap1967
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« Reply #1 on: January 21, 2012, 10:29:50 AM »

Its called Cold Process Oven Process or CPOP for short.  It does speed up cure time.  When I do it i leave the soap in the mold so it doesn't soften and change shape, am wondering if you will get lines from the racks. 

I do it on 170 degrees for one hour then turn the oven off and leave it in the oven overnight or at least several hours until the oven is cool.

I do it on the only soap I produce that is gelled.  Its nice that it speeds up cure a bit but I do it for the consistency in the appearance of the soap as I use slab molds and sometimes the gelling can be uneven.
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riverhouserustics
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« Reply #2 on: January 21, 2012, 11:12:13 AM »

Thanks so much!
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Opulence
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« Reply #3 on: January 21, 2012, 11:58:17 AM »

I do the CPOP, like soap1967, for soaps that gel.  I try to keep my batter at room temperature and put it in the freeze to avoid the gel.

If the raw soap is too warm at molding I put it in the oven in hopes of getting a consistent appearance . . . meaning no gel circle in the middle.

I, too, have a convection oven . . . sure wish I knew about "proofing" feature when I bought my oven . . . it would help with making jerky!!!
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riverhouserustics
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« Reply #4 on: January 21, 2012, 12:10:24 PM »

LOL- yes the proofing feature is nice to have - especially when baking bread!
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LiveMoreLady
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« Reply #5 on: January 24, 2012, 03:09:10 PM »

Hello from Livermore CA.
Still confused on the Over Cure?  I am hoping soon to make my first batch with a two pound mold. Waiting for delivery from Soap Making Resource. Have read a lot on the blogs, books and tutorials..but still confused on Oven cure.  so questions.  When do I  I put my mold in the oven at 170 for an hour..then turn off and leave overnight.....  As soon as I pour or wait a day? 

Do I release from mold and cut in when I remove from oven? 

How much does this excel the cure time?  4-5 weeks or less?
Does it hurt the oven...can I still bake it it without ill effects?
Any comments or suggestion will be appreciated.
LiveMoreLady
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soap1967
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« Reply #6 on: January 24, 2012, 04:19:03 PM »

You can find a lot of information on the internet regarding CPOP.  There are several ways to do it, you can put the soap in the oven at 170 degrees right after pouring.  Leave in an hour, turn the oven off and leave it in overnight.

I prefer to put my soap in after it has had 24 hours in the mold.  I am a goat milk soaper so it has much to do with that.  Too much risk to scald the milk if putting in directly after pour. I also prefer that particular soap to have a translucency to it that you get with gel...since I have slab molds gel can be inconsistent and this prevents that.

The soap does have to go in in its mold otherwise the soap can warp and god forbid melt into your oven.  Be sure your mold is oven proof if it came from Steve I would imagine you are in the clear.

The school of thought with CPOP is that you get the CP look and feel with the cure time of HP.  I disagree here.  I think CPOP does change the appearance of the soap a bit from regular CP.
The school of thought is that it also completes the saponification process completely and that the soap is ready.  I do believe saponification is complete but the bars still need cure time of at least 2 weeks maybe 3 - it does not evaporate all the water in my opinion.

Anyway - as I said you can find plenty on the internet and here regarding CPOP.  This is my experience with it with my recipe's.  Others may have different opinions.
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Frannie
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« Reply #7 on: January 24, 2012, 04:38:58 PM »

I agree with you Soap...There was a time that I did almost all of my soap this way.  Then a friend of mine told me that her bar didn't last as long as when I only did CP.  I felt horrible about that!  That's not what I had intended to do!   I did let them cure for 3 weeks--guess that wasn't long enough.  So I decided that I would go back to doing it CP and wait the other 3 to 5 weeks.  Now that I wait the 6 to 8 weeks for curing everyone is happy again...   Smiley

LiveMore, just try a batch and see how it works out for you---it just might!
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Opulence
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« Reply #8 on: January 24, 2012, 04:58:37 PM »

I CPOP only to get a complete gel . . . not to cure faster.  I made a beautiful batch of Sweet Potato and African Black Soap that contained raw goat's milk and honey.  I molded when the batter was warm but did not insulate.  My beautiful soap had a gel circle in the middle; the gel circle is still discolored but the soap is fine. I still let people try it; it was ugly but well received.

After that experience, I put my milk & honey soaps (that are too warm at molding) in the preheated oven for only 15 minutes or so.  I am not looking to cook the batter, just to make it warm enough to fully gel.  After that I will either keep it in the oven with the oven off or insulate the mold with blankets to hold the heat.

Keeping the mold in the heated oven for 1 hour seems very long . . . this seems like CPHP???
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soap1967
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« Reply #9 on: January 24, 2012, 05:09:52 PM »

One hour is what any website on CPOP advises.  I guess the intent here is to evap water as well to hasten cure time.  I do it for a gm soap that contains a high percentage of olive oil and it does shorten the cure time to a regular 4 weeks. 
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CGimenez
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« Reply #10 on: January 29, 2012, 08:09:40 PM »

You can find a lot of information on the internet regarding CPOP.  There are several ways to do it, you can put the soap in the oven at 170 degrees right after pouring.  Leave in an hour, turn the oven off and leave it in overnight.

I prefer to put my soap in after it has had 24 hours in the mold.  I am a goat milk soaper so it has much to do with that.  Too much risk to scald the milk if putting in directly after pour. I also prefer that particular soap to have a translucency to it that you get with gel...since I have slab molds gel can be inconsistent and this prevents that.

The soap does have to go in in its mold otherwise the soap can warp and god forbid melt into your oven.  Be sure your mold is oven proof if it came from Steve I would imagine you are in the clear.

The school of thought with CPOP is that you get the CP look and feel with the cure time of HP.  I disagree here.  I think CPOP does change the appearance of the soap a bit from regular CP.
The school of thought is that it also completes the saponification process completely and that the soap is ready.  I do believe saponification is complete but the bars still need cure time of at least 2 weeks maybe 3 - it does not evaporate all the water in my opinion.

Anyway - as I said you can find plenty on the internet and here regarding CPOP.  This is my experience with it with my recipe's.  Others may have different opinions.



I found your post most interesting... I'd never thought of doing CPOP after 24 hours with a milk soap.  I always put my milk soaps in the fridge for at least 24 hours.  The last soap I did this way still came out with a partial gel even though it was in a thin plastic mold.  I am wondering if you don't put your milk soaps in until they have set for 24 hours what the end result of putting them in the oven is... do you think it would be possible to still achieve a full gel with a milk soap if it has already done a partial gel?  Mine has been out of the fridge for 36 hours and is now cut so I'm thinking it's too late but might be a solution in the future?  I'm thinking if 99% of the saponification occurs within the first 24 hours then it wouldn't be possible to achieve a full gel after that point...

Hope this makes sense...what are your thoughts?






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soap1967
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« Reply #11 on: January 29, 2012, 08:21:14 PM »

yes I think you can still get a full gel even if it has been 24 hours.  There used to be the best site on milk soaping and the guy CPOP after 24 hours for milk soap so he didn't scald the milk.  Wish I could remember how I found that site!!
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